HER SMELL

Elisabeth Moss in the Role of a Rock Star. Aaaaaaaah?

We would almost go so far as to say that this is her best role to date because she is completely insane. As punk rocker Becky, she is a charismatic and rumbling freight train of an artist who abuses all kinds of substances, which has a particularly negative impact on her daughter in the first long, insanely intense scenes in the backstage room after a concert, where we meet her for the first time. She is played by Courtney Love, who plays another Courtney Love in the film. Throughout the film, Moss is ass-irritating, endearing, scorchingly sharp, and ultimately deeply vulnerable.

I’m Just Hoping to Catch a Screening of ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Again

Do not do so. Alex Ross Perry’s film outperforms it in every way as a true authentic insight into the 1990s alternative rock scene, drawing inspiration from all-girl bands such as Bikini Kill and L7, among others. But first and foremost, a convincing character portrait of a musical genius who has difficulty distinguishing between art and intoxication, and who is despised by everyone around him. It is superbly substantiated by the disturbing sound design and long takes before the moving calm final act with something as rare as a heartbreaking Bryan Adams cover, which is superbly substantiated by the disturbing sound design and long takes Then you’ve seen it with your own eyes. You will, on the other hand, have to visit the American iTunes store in order to see for yourself.

Don’t expect to walk into “Her Smell,” the sixth feature from writer/director Alex Ross Perry, and walk out with calm instead of chaos. “Her Smell” is a suffocating plunge into the deteriorating world of a female musician. In any case, the former aftertaste had never been the kind of lingering odor that any of Perry’s previous films had left. From “Listen Up Philip” to “Golden Exits,” his cinema has always been preoccupied with Woody Allen-esque anti-heroes and misbehaving aristocrats, with their sympathies openly (and sometimes, subtly) aligned with males even when the films themselves were female-centric, as evidenced by his films “Listen Up Philip” and “Golden Exits.”

© 2022